The Fine Art of Dusting the Office

Woman Dusting

Dusting is one of those chores your mother always made you do, and now you have an aversion to it—if you’re like most people. Dusting the office has many merits, and it’s crucial to the ongoing health and image of your facility.

Why You Need to Dust the Office

Dust comes into the office through air vents, on the shoes and clothing of staff and visitors, and—yes, it’s true—from the sloughing off of our own skin and hair cells. A large component of dust is human skin cells but it also contains ash, mold, dust mites, fungus and pollen. Any of these may cause breathing problems, eye irritation and allergic reactions. Some components of dust can spread infectious diseases. Dust can degrade copiers, phone systems, computer servers and other sensitive electronic equipment, shortening their useful life. The accumulation of dust in the office projects a poor image to customers and is a major reason for the use of cleaning products. If you have your workplace dusted regularly, you’ll need fewer harsh chemicals to clean it.

Dusting Best Practices

A commercial cleaning contractor secret: dust high, then dust low. At home, we might forego regular dusting of cabinet and furniture tops simply because we can’t see the dust buildup. But “out of sight, out of mind” can be a dangerous practice in the office, for the reasons described above. For readily visible, horizontal surfaces, dusting twice per week or more is requisite, and more if your location is particularly dusty. Elevated surfaces should be dusted every two weeks, at a minimum. If you plan to do some of the dusting in-house, procure a professional set of dusting tools to do the job right. A telescoping duster made of lamb’s wool is critical, otherwise dust from on high will simply be volatized back into the air rather than trapped in the duster. For lower surfaces, microfiber cloth works well, however using a dust spray product on wood surfaces prevents scratches, preserves surfaces and keeps dust from going back into the air.

Alternatives to DIY Dusting

If you currently use a commercial cleaning contractor, explore having regular dusting services added to your contract. Commercial vacuum cleaners are much more effective than those designed for home use, particularly when cleaning high surfaces. If you don’t use a janitorial service, consider trying one out. The internal staff hours saved will more than offset the cost. A dust-free office conveys your commitment to excellence, both to your clients and your employees, and provides a healthy and attractive work environment for all to enjoy.